MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – JULY 1993

Ten years on from their breakthrough hit ‘The Lovecats’, The Cure, or rather, Robert Smith, is the cover star of Q from this edition from 1993.

In news, David Bowie collaborator Mick Ronson has died and Q pays tribute to him.

Meanwhile, George Michael has just launched proceedings against Sony Records in order to try and be released from his contract.

Michael lost the case, and was unable to release any new music from 1990 to 1996.

The letters page is dominated by the previous issue, which seemingly featured a naked Terence Trent D’Arby on the cover. Not all of the feedback was positive.

Meanwhile, Robert Smith gets four pages dedicated to him, including a graph of his various hairstyles through the years.

In chart news, REM (33 weeks in the chart) have the top spot, beating off competition from new entry by 2 Unlimited. Techno Techno Techno Techno.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – JANUARY 1990

The first Q of a new decade, looking back at the last decade, as the cover has a montage of 1980s icons Madonna, U2, Bob Geldof, Mark Knopfler, George Michael with the headline “THE 80s : HOW WAS IT FOR YOU?”

For me, not bad. I missed the first three years, but I spent the rest of the decade crapping my nappy then watching Ghostbusters cartoons. Good times.

Gary Glitter is the subject of Q’s “Who the hell does ……..” feature. The answer we now know, is a big fat fuck paedophile.

In news, Terence Trent D’Arby suffered a humiliating episode at the hands of an autograph hunter, who asked him which one of Mili Vanilla he was.

In Adwatch, you could get a free chart album with 50 Budweiser ringpulls or a chart album for £2 with 18.

Considering the charts were dominated by Sonia, Jive Bunny, Jason Donovan and Reynolds Girls, you’d need to drink about 50 tins of Budweiser to want to listen to any of them.

The 1980s gets reviewed with a Q and A with a headline act from each year such as Suggs (1980) Human League (1981) Culture Club (1982) and so forth.

An advert in the magazine promotes that Queen were selling their Budapest concert available on CD Video, an early version of the DVD.

The 50 Best Albums Of 1989 looks back at the best albums of the year, featuring Stone Roses debut album, still lauded by music writers 22 years on.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : Q – DECEMBER 1988

In this edition of The Magazine Archive, we look at Q in December 1988, a world where REM are on the cover, and Freddie Mercury dabbles in the world of opera.

This month, the music world is being set alight by a controversial and fiesty peroxide blonde. Not Lady GaGa, but Wendy James of Transvision Vamp, who gets a double page profile.

In news, Pete Waterman goes to war with Radio One at an industry conference by describing the station’s management as “40 year old tossers”

Pete Waterman, remember, was born in 1947.

In the letters section, Terence Trent D’arby writes to complain about a favourable review, that he is not worthy of comparison to Robert Cray.

Meanwhile, Dominic Sturges from Sheffield wrote in to complain that the back cover of the Pet Shop Boys album ‘Introspective’ gives a running time of 50 minutes and 3 seconds, which he says he has counted each song and this is wrong.

Freddie Mercury gets five pages dedicated to his opera collaboration with Monserrat Caballe as they perform a concert to mark the countdown to Barcelona hosting the 1992 Olympics.

Sadly, Mercury didn’t live to see Barcelona to host the games.

Five pages are given to a look at the world of Paparazzi and how it has changed coming to the end of the 1980s.

The article finishes with a breakdown of rankings of celebrities and their photo value by status.

In December 1988, Bros was A-List while Paul McCartney was C-List. Yes, you read that right.

Even more staggering, is that Michael Jackson and U2 were B-List ……. behind Bros.

Roger Moore shares a spot as a D-List celeb alongside Andrew Ridgeley, Simon Le Bon, Johnny Hates Jazz and Ian Botham.

E-Listers in December 1988 included Anita Dobson and Sinitta, now appearing in reality TV.

Sadly, fellow E-Lister Ben Volpliere-Pierrot from Curiousity Killed the Cat is still awaiting for his phonecall to appear on a reality TV show.