MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SMASH HITS – 3.1.1985

As 1985 starts, Wham! are the cover stars of Smash Hits, who join them on tour, stating that their fans enjoy their gigs than people who go to see Duran Duran, Culture Club and Spandau Ballet.

As you open the magazine, there is a poster of Adam Ant.

In news, Smash Hits launches an Australian version, to compliment the American version, which is known as Star Hits.

Ian McCullough of Echo and the Bunnymen is interviewed, as the band takes a year off.

There are three pages dedicated to Alannah Currie’s life story so far. You know, her from Thompson Twins.

Smash Hits joins Wham! on tour in Edinburgh, and Andrew Ridgeley dresses up for the occasion by wearing a tartan suit.

Concert Reviews sees Smash Hits go to see UB40, Howard Jones and Cocteau Twins.

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50 YEARS OF TOP OF THE POPS : JAN 17 – JAN 23

We begin this week by celebrating the birth of a Rolling Stone called Mick, but not that one. Mick Taylor, a Stone from 1969 to 1974, here in one of their last TOTP studio appearances before they became too busy/big for the show, then too low charting.

17th January is a birthday for not 1, not 2, but 3 1980s stars. Paul Young (1956) being introduced here by Simon Le Bon.

Meanwhile, three years later (or, 1959) saw the birth of Susanna Hoffs. As a treat, here’s The Bangles performing Eternal Flame in 2001, shortly after Atomic Kitten took a cover of it to Number 1.

And finally, in 1964, Andy Rourke. You know, one of the two in The Smiths that wasn’t Johnny Marr or Morrissey.

Onto more recent times, Ricky Wilson from Kaiser Chiefs (and, um, The Voice) turns 36 this week.

While Calvin Harris turns 31 this week.

It’s a busy week for birthdays, with Tom Bailey of Thompson Twins turning 60. Here’s Mike Read introducing them by playing Harmonica.

Sir John Mills grandson is 41 this week. You may know him better as the singer from Kula Shaker.

Meanwhile, here’s Hard-Fi living for the weekend in 2005

Meanwhile, Robert Palmer would have been eligible for a bus pass this week if he was still alive. Here’s a random find of him performing with The Power Station, introduced by Harry Hill.

Nicky Wire from the Manics is 45 this week. Here they are performing Everything Must Go. Is it me, or does the drum loop slightly rip off Be My Baby?

The birthdays keep coming, Gary Barlow (1971) and Emma Bunton (1976)

Now to some would be birthdays, first Malcolm McLaren

And Michael Hutchence, who would have been 52 this week.

Sporting some dodgy gym gear in 1987

Performing ‘Taste It’

And finally, being introduced by his ex, Kylie Minogue in 1997, the year he later died.

Almost near the end of this week’s Birthday Bonanza, one last one, Andrew Roachford, or just plain Roachford.

Though, you can’t hear ‘Cuddly Toy’ without thinking about this.

And finally, we end on a sad note, as this week saw the 18th anniversary of the death of the London Boys. This song, is just fantastic.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : NO 1 – 22.12.1984

It’s Christmas 1984, there’s no need to be afraid.

A quick look at Wikipedia tells us that No 1 was a Smash Hits type magazine which ran from 1983-1992.

There is a split cover, with John Taylor looking back on the year with Tony Hadley, and Paul Weller being interviewed by Boy Goerge. In further surrealness, Madness go skiing with the Thompson Twins, while Kim While goes partying with Nick Heyward. It is unknown if Kim Wilde and Nick Heyward’s party involved drunkenly singing on the tube.

John Taylor and Tony Hadley look back at the year, of big Number Ones (but not for their respective bands)

Highlights include :

John Taylor

(On the book, 1984) “It may be a lot closer to what is happening in Chile and Poland”

(On the Miner’s Strike) “The actual cause appears to be establish Arthur Scargill as the leader of the country”

(On Ronald Reagan) “It’s a bit better than that miserable git Mondale”

Tony Hadley

(On football) “I quite like football, but I never have the time to keep up with what’s happening”

(On Ronald Reagan) “I dislike Ronald Reagan. He thinks he’s John Wayne”

Meanwhile, Nick Heyward and Kim Wilde do a picture story of them getting ready to go on a date.

Various pop stars are given a platform for their highs and lows of 1984. Simon Le Bon’s low point was ‘Wild Boys’ not getting to Number One. I’m with him on this one, it’s Duran Duran’s best song, and should have been a Number One.

Tom Bailey, Jay Aston and Curt Smith have political issues as their low point, with Curt Smith having a similar viewpoint on Arthur Scargill as John Taylor.

Sarah from Bananarama rejoices in having a US Top Ten hit, while bemoaning stepping on dogshit in a carpark in Germany.

Paul Weller lists Ronald Reagan’s re-election as US President as his low point of 1984.

Roddy Frame is in support of the Miner’s Strike, describing it as his high point of 1984.

Tracey Ullman lists Lionel Ritchie’s video for ‘Hello’ as her 1984 low point. Time has shown it to be a classic pop video …….. in a ‘so bad it’s good’ kind of way.

Gary Glitter bemoans the lack of jobs for young people. Not going to comment on that.

No 1 readers were out voting for their favourite song of 1984, voting for ‘Careless Whisper’ by George Michael as the best song of the year. Wasn’t even the best George Michael song (Freedom by Wham since you ask, his best ever song he has recorded)

Ali and Robin Campbell get a double page spread talking about Christmas in the Campbell household. Ali Campbell’s first Christmas present that he can remember was a pair of George Best football boots.

There is an advert for music VHS including U2 Live At Red Rocks, and Now That’s What I Call Music 4.

Bucks Fizz are reviewing the recent singles, with Mike Nolan describing Band Aid as “It reminds me of that song by Greg Emerson, I mean, Greg Lake” and saying “If Queen can’t do a good Chritsmas song, I don’t think anyone can” before adding “I prefer ‘Mull Of Kintye'” in reference to Paul McCartney’s Frog Chorus.