MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 11.1.1986

It’s a cup edition of Shoot this week, with the FA Cup 3rd Round, and a World Cup calendar included in this edition. The cover star, Ray Stewart of West Ham and Scotland, was hoping for glory in both.

Don Howe is interviewed, where he says he knows he could lose his job as Arsenal manager and his role in the England coaching set-up if both teams fail in 1986.

Manchester United’s FA Cup tie against Rochdale is previewed, with Shoot warning that Steve Taylor could be Rochdale’s danger man.

Nigel Callaghan gets a full page profile after handing in a transfer request at Watford, but denies he has had a bust-up with manager Graham Taylor.

Steve Moran tells Shoot that he hopes 1986 will bring him better luck that 1985, when he damaged knee ligaments in and end of season friendly in the Caribbean

Jan Molby gets a full page feature, crediting Kenny Dalglish for his turnaround in form, and revealing that he practices free-kicks.

Mick Harford also gets a full page feature, but it’s the opposite from Molby’s piece, which sees manager (David Pleat) praising player, stating that the Luton forward should be in the England squad.

It’s all one big love-in this week, with Paul Gascoigne of Newcastle United crediting manager Willie McFaul with the weight loss that has enabled him to be a professional footballer.

Despite English clubs being banned from Europe, they were well represented in the Adidas Awards, with Everton beating Manchester United to Team Of The Year, while Kerry Dixon was a finalist for Golden Boot, alongside Frank McDougall of Scotland and Martin McGaughey of Northern Ireland.

Hibs get a team profile where manager John Blackley declares he is building a team with ambitions of winning the league.

In news, Ian Greaves turned down the job as West Brom manager because they are sponsored by an anti smoking body and he is a dedicated smoker, Aston Villa want to sign Kevin Richardson from Everton, and Tommy Docherty dismisses England’s World Cup chances.

Manchester United defender Graeme Hogg tells Shoot he is hoping to curb his aggression and avoid suspension, while Billy Stark is the subject of this week’s “Focus On ……”

His favourite music is U2, Alison Moyet and Dire Straits.

Advertisements

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 2.11.1985

Kenny Dalglish, in his first few months as Liverpool manager, is this week’s cover star of Shoot, as he is in the middle of wielding the axe at Anfield.

Shoot gives a double page spread to this, as Alan Kennedy has left, Phil Neal is leaving, and Paul Walsh has been placed on the Transfer List.

The 3rd Round of the League Cup is previewed, and has some attractive ties, with West Ham (Old Trafford) and Arsenal (Maine Road) travelling to Manchester, Liverpool facing bogey side Brighton, and an East Midlands Derby between Derby County and Nottingham Forest, with a public spat brewing in the build-up between Derby Director Stuart Webb and Nottingham Forest Manager Brian Clough, after Webb claimed that Derby (then in the 3rd Division) were a better choice than Forest for any proposed breakaway Super League.

In news, Manchester United are lining up a bid to sign Maurice Malpas, while Kevin Sheedy has set himself a target of 20 goals this season for Everton.

One man hoping to take Malpas place in the Scotland team was Tommy Burns, having been converted from Midfield to Defence, is eyeing up a return to the Scotland squad after an absence of two years.

Paul Walsh’s potential departure from Liverpool is discussed by Bryan Robson in his column, who feels he is making a mistake by wanting to leave Anfield.

Jimmy Greaves awards his Star Letter award to Steven Wilkinson from Paisley, who proposes that Tommy Docherty should be the new Scotland manager, with there being a vacancy for the position due to the death of Jock Stein.

Peter Reid’s column reveals that Graeme Sharp has been singing “Down Mexico Way” in order to wind up the Welsh players at Everton, after Scotland eliminated Wales from the World Cup. One of those Welsh players, Neville Southall, was described by Reid as the best goalkeeper in the world.

Blackburn Rovers get a full page profile, with striker Jimmy Quinn desperate for the club to reach the top flight after so many near misses.

In Scotland, Aberdeen and Hibs were going head to head in the League Cup Final, with Alex Ferguson being desperate to win this, as it was the only domestic trophy he hadn’t won at Pittodrie so far.

Aberdeen won the match 3-0.

Shoot does a double page spread looking at the impact of recently appointed Sunderland Manager Lawrie McMenamy, while Alan Brazil pleads for the opportunity to lead Manchester United’s attack.

The magazine ends with a profile of Trevor Peake.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 19.10.1985

Running away with the league title, Mark Hughes is the cover star as Match asks if this is Untied’s best ever team.

Also making a good start was Reading, who secured the record for most successive wins at the start of the season with a win at Newport, and they get three pages.

Frank McAvennie gets a full page profile, with opposing players who have faced West Ham giving their opinions of him, after 10 goals in his first 11 games for West Ham.

Former Manchester United manager Tommy Docherty gets asked to compare the current United team with their European Cup winning side of the 1960s, giving each player a mark out of 10, with the 1985 team winning 98 to 89.

In Scotland, the East Terracing at Hampden Park will be renamed the Jock Stein Stand in memory of the former Scotland manager, who died recently.

Aberdeen, Dundee United and St Mirren are all flying the flag for Scottish football in Europe this week.

Also in European competition, Bangor City of Wales have hit the jackpot after being drawn against Spanish giants Atletico Madrid.

Glenn Roeder of Newcastle United gets asks about his favourites, and his favourite cartoon character is The Pink Panther.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.9.1979

Nottingham Forest winger John Robertson, pictured holding the European Cup, is the cover star accompanied by the headline “CAN FOREST RETAIN THE EUROPEAN CUP?”, as Europe’s three competitions are getting ready to swing into action.

The biggest threat to Forest’s grip on the trophy, in Robertson’s opinion, came from Liverpool, who he said he hope would get put out early, but admitted the two teams playing in the final would be great for English football.

As it turned out, Liverpool had an early exit, a First Round exit to Soviet team Dinamo Tblisi, while Forest would go on and retain the trophy, beating Hamburg 1-0 in Madrid.

Turning over the page, Shoot does a full page feature on the chances of the British sides in their ties, against a various mix of opponents.

In news, Alan Ball Snr (father of 1966 World Cup winner of the same name) is singing the praises of Scandinavian players as representing value for English clubs, having just spent three years coaching in Sweden.

Colin Bell of Manchester City announced his retirement aged 33.

Lawrie McMenemy expressed his fears of a “Super League” emerging within England’s top flight, due to the spending power of some clubs.

Brian Quinn moved from Larne to Everton for £60,000 – a record between clubs from Northern Ireland and England, and is aiming to be the 10th Everton player to play for Northern Ireland since World War II, just short of the 14 players supplied by joint record holders Manchester United and Linfield.

Alex Sabella turned down a move from Sheffield United …….. because his wife wasn’t keen on living in the North-East.

Motherwell manager Ally MacLeod is to be investigated by the SFA after publishing a book claiming that Willie Johnston wasn’t the only Scotland player to have taken illegal substances at the previous summer’s World Cup.

In his column, Ray Clemence is looking forward to his first trip to the Soviet Union, for Liverpool’s European Cup tie with Dinamo Tblisi.

Shoot does a full page feature on the West Country, interviewing a player from Plymouth Argyle, Exeter City and Torquay United on the future of football in the area.

Dave Watson, recently signed for Werder Bremen, was sent off in his second game for the club, and bemoans the strictness of German referees, while also dismissing criticism of his signing by German newspaper Bild.

Andy Gray hits back after being booed by Aston Villa fans after requesting a transfer, and was upset by Villa holding out for £1m, stating no player is worth that amount (though Trevor Francis was earlier that year)

Later that month, Gray signed for Wolves for £1.5m

There was a four page feature on Manchester City, including a double page colour poster.

Tommy Docherty is in fighting form, proclaiming “I’m still one of the best”, and that he is happy with his summer spending having spent £1m on five players, including England Under 21 goalkeeper Chris Woods.

Docherty had been sacked by Manchester United two years previously due to an extramarital affair, and was hoping his spell at Loftus Road would propel him back into the big time.

QPR finished 5th in Division Two (no play-offs then, only the top 3 went up) and Docherty was sacked, before being reinstated, than sacked again in October 1980.

“Life has never been happier at the aptly named Gay Meadow” writes Shoot, presumably in The Flintstones sense, as manager Graham Turner has just led them into England’s second tier for the first time.

Shoot gives a page to Ian Redford, a star at Dundee described as “The new Alan Gilzean”

Redford joined Rangers in 1980 for a Scottish record, won four trophies at Ibrox, and played for Dundee United in the 1987 UEFA Cup Final. Redford died in January 2014, aged 53.

Gordon McQueen uses his column to claim that he scored United’s goal against Southampton on the opening day of the season, which was credited as an own goal, and denies rumours that Mickey Thomas was to be sold to Everton in an exchange for Dave Thomas.

On the back page, there was a colour poster of new Crystal Palace signings Gerry Francis and Mike Flanagan.