MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : VOX – AUGUST 1995

It’s the summer of 1995 and Britpop is on the rise, but it’s an American, Michael Stipe of REM, who is the cover star of this edition of Vox.

In news, Depeche Mode are now down to three members following the departure of Alan Wilder, while Oasis have announced that their second album, “Morning Glory” is finished and ready for release in September, while there were rumours that Paul Weller would join Oasis on stage at Glastonbury.

The Cure announced plans for a new album in February 1996, Nancy Sinatra posed for Playboy at the age of 52, and the BBC were planning six hours of programming to commemorate the 10th anniversary of Live Aid.

Vox looks at the trend of Indie bands becoming pin-ups, and Boybands getting serious, with contributions from PJ Harvey, Holly Johnson, and Martin Carr from Boo Radleys.

Bands tipped for success include Whale, Thurman and Cast.

Armando Ianucci is interviewed, ahead of the launch of his new satire show, Saturday Night Armistice, which is accompanied by a picture of him licking an iron.

Chemical Brothers get a two page interview about heir recent successes, while three pages are dedicated to Oasis singles cover art, with comments and anecdotes from Brian Cannon (Art Director) and Michael Spencer Jones (Photographer)

There’s more Oasis a few pages later, as Paul Slattery, a photographer who accompanied them on tour, shows off his best photos from the year he spent with them.

Therapy? get a four page interview, accompanied with a photo of them dressed as clowns.

The National Lottery has recently been set up, so Vox asks various bands such as Dodgy, Shampoo, Supergrass, Pulp, Sparks and Ned’s Atomic Dustbin what they would do if they won the lottery.

Gene were that months guest reviewers, sticking the boot into Paul Weller’s single “Wings Of Speed”, with Martin Rossiter stating “This is a dreadful ballad. If Mariah Carey sang this, we’d all be slagging it right off”

The Verve are interviewed over two pages in LA, with the introductory line “Can The Verve follow in Oasis footsteps?”

Jim and William Reid from Jesus and Mary Chain are asked about their most hated things, aiming their vitriol at UB40 and Chris De Burgh.

Cover star Michael Stipe is interviewed, speaking about how REM are getting back on track, following Bill Berry’s onstage collapse earlier that year.

Mick Jones of The Clash gets a full page interview of his memories of punk.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : VOX – SEPTEMBER 1994

Beastie Boys are the cover stars, as Vox looks back at 3 festivals during the summer of 1994.

In news, the BBC announced plans for a music festival called Music Live 95, to be held over the late May Bank Holiday in Birmingham.

Suede have decided not to split, following the departure of Bernard Butler.

Eric Clapton dressed up as Batman to raise money for charity, while Oasis are going on a UK tour this month following success festival appearances.

Video CDs receive a boost in sales following releases from Queen, Tina Turner, Pink Floyd, Kate Bush and Tina Turner.

VH1 launches, and will be broadcasting repeats of The Old Grey Whistle Test, while MTV (parent company of VH1) are considering bringing back the show on MTV.

Vox predicted big things for a band from Dublin called Blink. As it turned out, their main contribution to music history would be to copyright the name Blink, and force and American band called Blink to become Blink 182.

There is coverage of the Edinburgh Festival, doing a joint interview with Donna McPhail, Stewart Lee and Dorian Crook, labelling them the three hottest talents at this year’s Fringe.

The 3 main festivals getting covered are Phoenix, Lollapalooza and Glastonbury with a combined 15 pages covering these 3 events.

Terry Hall, formerly of The Specials gets a double page spread as he launches his solo career, at the same time he quits smoking.

With the World Cup over, and the Premier League not yet started, Vox comes up with a novel idea, of Team Tabs for your favourite bands, and a league table to chart their progress, complete with cartoons of Paul Weller, Jay Kay, Michael Stipe and Sinead O’Connor in football kits.

Vox looks at the history of t-shirts in music, asking Louise Wener, Sonya from Echobelly, Malcolm McLaren and James Dean Bradfield to talk about their favourite t-shirts.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : VOX – NOVEMBER 1994

Dolores O’Riodan is the cover star as Vox celebrates it’s 50th edition.

The main features, however, were of Blur and REM. Guitarist Peter Buck comments “I Shudder to think that I might be playing in stadiums when i’m 51, like the Stones”

When Peter Buck was 51 (2007), REM were still doing stadium gigs.

This month saw the launch of a column where musicians guest review singles. The honour of the very first one went to Andy Cairns, frontman of Therapy?

To celebrate the 50th edition, Vox asked 90s popstars for their review of the 90s so far, and what they thought would be on the cover of Vox in 2000 (Vox was actually wound up before then)

Noel Gallagher’s 2000 front cover is “OASIS – WHERE ARE THEY NOW?” – the answer would be, releasing their 4th album, while his hopes for the rest of the 90s would be for a second Stone Roses album, Man City to win a trophy and The Verve to do a gig on the moon.

Only one of those events happened, and it was the most far fetched suggestion, Stone Roses releasing a second album.

The Grid, a side project of Soft Cell’s David Ball list Bryan Adams being number one as the worst global event of the 90s, while suggesting that Oasis will be on the cover of Vox in 2000, as “We’ll all be having a 90s revival by then”

Nicky Wire’s Vox cover reply is “Hopefully Vox won’t exist by then” – His hope was correct.