MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : IRISH SOCCER MAGAZINE – OCTOBER 1998

Paul Doolin of Bohemians and Denis Irwin are the cover stars of Irish Soccer Magazine, which you could have purchased for IR£1.50 at Tuthills. Sorry, I couldn’t get the sticker off.

The editorial focuses on Pat Dolan’s disillusionment with the League Of Ireland and his threat to quit, hoping that he doesn’t.

There is a preview of Republic Of Ireland’s forthcoming Euro 2000 away to Yugoslavia, stating that a draw would be a more than acceptable result.

That match would be postponed because of unrest in The Balkans, eventually being played in November 1998.

In foreign news, Manchester United, Liverpool and Arsenal are said to be involved in the creation of a European Super League.

There is a feature on TV coverage of football in Republic Of Ireland, as a new commercial broadcaster, TV3, is launched, and this is welcomed, as it means competition for RTE will mean they have to raise their game.

As well as looking forward to Yugoslavia, there is a look back at Republic Of Ireland’s opening Euro 2000 Qualifier, a 2-0 win over World Cup Semi-Finalists Croatia.

Eamonn Gibson has a column on British football, where he writes that the Bosman Rule and foreign import at other clubs have caused Manchester United to stand still. There is also a feature on the possibility of Wimbledon relocating to Dublin, after a recent poll claimed Dubliners were in favour of it.

There is a preview of domestic games in October, the highlight being the clash between St Patrick’s Athletic and Cork City at the end of the month.

There is also a preview of the games in September, a month that saw Brian Kerr awarded Manager Of The Month.

Cork City were recently in European action, and their defeat in the European Cup Winners Cup to CSKA Kiev gets a page of coverage.

In Dublin, St Patrick’s Athletic have announced plans to leave Richmond Park to build a new stadium at nearby St Michael’s Flats within the next five years, while the FAI have announced plans for a 40,000 all seater stadium, as well as redevelopment for Tolka Park and Dalymount Park.

The new commercial broadcaster TV3 gets a feature, focusing on their proposed football coverage, having bought the rights to Republic Of Ireland’s away Euro 2000 Qualifiers.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 16.8.1986

With a new national team manager appointed and the league season due to Start, the cover of this edition of Shoot doesn’t just focus on Scotland, but a Welshman bound for Italy – Ian Rush, who has just signed for Juventus.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page feature from Shoot columnist Bryan Robson, with his hopes for Manchester United in 1986-1987, with him expecting Gordon Strachan, one of Scotland’s stars at the World Cup, to continue his return to form.

Strachan’s future international caps would be coming under the recently appointed Andy Roxburgh, an internal appointment having been Director of Coaching, beat off competition from Jim McLean and Billy McNeill for the role, with the man who appointed him, SFA President David Will, describing him as “knowing more than Alex Ferguson”

Shoot’s editorial focuses on Billy Bingham preparing to agree to become manager of Saudi Arabian club Al Nasser while managing Northern Ireland as well, and that he could struggle taking on the two roles at the same time.

In news, Jesper Olsen is set to leave Manchester United, with PSV Eidnhoven his most likely destination, while across Manchester, City manager Billy McNeill wasn’t too unhappy at missing out on the Scotland job, as he and his family were settled in the North-West of England.

One Scotsman who could be on the move was Paul Sturrock of Dundee United, with Aberdeen manager Alex Ferguson looking to sign him

Northern Ireland’s champions Linfield are celebrating their centenary with a friendly against Brazilian side Flamengo, with Zico and Socrates both guaranteed to be playing.

Meanwhile, England’s top flight clubs have examined the practicalities of a breakaway Super League, with representatives running up an expense bill of £32,000

It’s a new era in Scotland with the top flight now comprising of 12 clubs, and Rangers have a new manager in Graeme Souness, beginning the season away to Hibs.

There was a double page spread with the fixture lists for England’s top four divisions.

One player determined for make a good start in that new season was Graham Roberts, who wasn’t selected for the World Cup, blaming himself for that, but he did get to face England’s nemesis Diego Maradona, as he had played in Ossie Ardiles Testimonial in May.

With players such as Warren Aspinall and Mike Newell joining top flight clubs, Wigan Athletic get a feature, looking at their reputation as a breeding ground for tomorrow’s stars.

A current star is Ian Rush, who has signed for Juventus, but will play for Liverpool for a season before heading to Turin in 1987. In the feature, Shoot looks at the fortunes of players who have previously moved between British clubs and Italian clubs.

In letters, one person wants Bryan Robson replaced in the England team by Steve Hodge, one person hates Denmark’s kit and a Scottish reader is unsure that Andy Roxburgh should have got the job as national team manager.

With Wimbledon about to begin their first season in top flight football 9 years after being elected to the Football League, with Shoot looking at what challenges face clubs looking to enter the Football League, as 1986-1987 was the first season to have promotion and relegation to and from the 4th Division.

Beside it, Shoot has a feature on World Cup stars moving outside their native countries to head to Mainland Europe on their back of their World Cup performances.

Also on the move was Alan Mullery, who had returned to Brighton for a second spell as manager, and gets a full page feature.

Someone who was on the move for the first time was Paul Power, who signed for Everton after 11 years at Manchester City.

The PFA have set up a working group amongst clubs in the North-West of England to try and make football more family friendly.

In adverts, Puma have brought out a new Kenny Dalglish branded boot.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 20.2.1999

It’s mid February, the season is approaching the final run, with the resumption of European football less than a fortnight away, and David Beckham is the cover star, making the bold proclamation that “United are good enough to win it all”

As you open the magazine, there is a full page feature on Wimbledon, with defender Chris Perry giving a guided tour of Selhurst Park, lamenting the fact that Wimbledon don’t have their own stadium.

Perry says “We need our own base, but I can’t see us getting our own stadium in the near future”

Sadly, Wimbledon moved to Milton Keynes in 2003, and a new club was formed when the Milton Keynes move was announced in 2002.

The new club (though not at Selhurst Park) have had to groundshare, but are hopeful of a new stadium.

Nottingham Forest’s Alan Rodgers, pictured scoring against Manchester United, is mocked with a caption “THEY NEVER SAW IT COMING” as his goal made it 1-1. The final score was Nottingham Forest 1-8 Manchester United.

Adie Moses of Barnsley offers his top five bands : 1. Stone Roses 2. Shed Seven 3. Oasis 4. Blur 5. The Charlatans

Meanwhile, Match weighs up Howard Wilkinson’s chances of being pernament England manager (he was caretaker at this time after the sacking of Glenn Hoddle)

Their conclusion was that it would be better if it was given to someone else.

Andy Booth is in a feature called “My first ……”

His first record was by Phil Collins, but he can’t remember what it was, and then declares he’s “Not that big a fan of Phil Collins”

His first concert was a Take That concert (his girlfriend wanted to go) and he describes them as “they weren’t bad actually”, and his first car was a Peugeot he got for 250 quid.

David Beckham gets a 3 page interview, previewing United’s European Cup Quarter-Final against Inter Milan, looking to draw inspiration from the 4-0 win over Porto in 1997.

The interview with Beckham signs off with his analysis of United’s trophy hunt “We want to win the European Cup, the FA Cup, and the title. It’s hard, but I believe we are capable of doing it”

Well, we all know what happened next.

Michael Owen gets a three page interview to commemorate the fact it was a year since his England debut (at the time, he was England’s youngest player) and there was a symmetry as his debut was a 2-0 home defeat, and his most recent appearance (against France, earlier that month) was a 2-0 home defeat, focusing on the build-up to the game against Chile, and the 1998 World Cup.

In posters, you could have got one of Manchester United substitute goalkeeper Raimond Van Der Gouw. Yes, really.

Kevin Phillips, of runaway Division One leaders Sunderland, gets a double page, followed by two pages profiling the other clubs battling for the other two promotion places, with a brief interview with a player from each club.

Clubs featured included Grimsby Town, now in the Conference.

John Aloisi, recently signed for Coventry from financially struggling (just like now, sadly) Portsmouth gets a double page interview on his move to the Premier League. At the side of the page is ten facts about Aloisi, including that his favourite band is Savage Garden, but not because they’re Australian.

Kanu, recently signed by Arsenal gets a double page interview, revealing that Marc Overmars used to give him a lift when they played together at Ajax.

In competitions, you could win tickets to the launch of the new England kit at the NEC in Birmingham.

In a sign of modern football gone mad, Match accompanies referee Uriah Rennie as he does a photoshoot for Fila. Yep, you read that right.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.7.1979

Match action from England’s recent visit to Sweden is the cover of Shoot, as they try to fill in the gap during the pre-season of 1979.

In news, Brian Clough has drawn praise from pundits in the Soviet Union after Nottingham Forest’s European Cup win, and Northern Ireland have announced a tour of Australia for the summer of 1980.

Pierce O’Leary of Shamrock Rovers was linked with a move to Coventry City, potentially, the first League Of Ireland player to move to an English club for a six figure fee. Staying in Dublin, Pele was a surprise visitor to Dublin for the friendly between Republic of Ireland and Argentina.

Distillery were facing expulsion from the Irish League if they couldn’t have a new ground by the start of the 1980-1981 season.

And finally, Coventry City became the first Football League team to visit the Faroe Islands, beating a local team 6-0.

The volume of British players in the US meant the NASL got a page of coverage, the lead story being that George Best had went missing for a week.

Gordon McQueen, writing a column, expresses his concern that the games between England and Scotland could be banned due to crowd violence, expressing his anger at a Scottish fan who invaded the pitch with his side 1-0 up, causing a delay. England went on to win the game 3-1.

McQueen also spoke about an 18 year old called Diego Maradona, who faced Scotland and was described by McQueen as “Another Pele in the making”, but was disappointed at the lack of TV coverage of the game, due to a dispute with the BBC.

In letters, a Shrewsbury Town fan complains about the lack of acknowledgement given to boss Graham Turner for his success at the club. A reader from Perth wrote in to complain about the BBC being biased towards Rangers.

A young manager starting out in the game is 32 year old Howard Kendall, and his appointment at Blackburn Rovers gets 2/3 of a page coverage.

RC Strasbourg get a full page profile, with a team poster on the other side.

To fill up space with no football, we get a full page of footballers on holiday, including a picture of Phil Neal throwing Phil Thompson into a swimming pool.

Part 8 of Shoot’s review of the 1978-1979 season reveals that Barcelona want Bobby Robson to be their manager. It only took 17 years for them to get him.

Derek Johnstone’s Scottish football column is accompanied by a picture of him playing video games with his wife.

Wigan Athletic, having just completed their first season as a league club, feature in an article asking if they will “Do a Wimbledon” – Wimbledon (promoted to the Football League in 1977) got promoted in their second season.

Wigan did indeed “Do a Wimbledon” in terms that they reached the top flight (in 27 years compared to Wimbledon’s 9) and won the FA Cup (took them 35 years compared to Wimbledon’s 11)

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 17.4.1993

Ian Wright and Mark Bright, former team-mates at Crystal Palace, now playing for Arsenal and Sheffield Wednesday, are the cover stars as Shoot looks forward to the League Cup Final between the two clubs.

In news, each member of the Scotland squad received a bottle of champagne from Berti Vogts, but Brian McClair was unable to collect his, so Pat Nevin claimed on his behalf. McClair was still waiting to receive his.

It was announced that week that Aston Villa were to face Everton in a friendly in Mauritius at the end of May 1993.

Meanwhile, if you wanted a bizarre piece of Arsenal memorabilia was on sale, with the infamous mural behind the goal while a stand was being built at Highbury going for sale.

Shoot does a double page report on reserve team football, taking a look at the game between QPR and Wimbledon, looking at the type of player (young, out of favour, returning from injury, etc) who are involved in these games, and how they use it in their careers.

Rangers, potentially one game away from the European Cup Final, get a full page preview of their game against CSKA Moscow, with Richard Gough being interviewed about their ability to come from behind in European games.

The set-up of the European Cup needs explained to give context, much different from today’s competition.

It was a straight knock-out until the Last 8, when, instead of Quarter-Finals, two groups of two, with the group winners meeting in the final.

After five games, Rangers were level on points with Marseille, but the French side had a vastly superior Goal Difference.

Rangers needed to get a better result than Marseille. Marseille won, making Rangers 0-0 draw at home to CSKA Moscow irrelevant.

Kris Lee writes to Jimmy Greaves to say that Arsenal should give David O’Leary a coaching role while Joao Miguel Marabuto Neves from Portugal writes in about Rangers, saying that despite beating Leeds in the European Cup, Manchester United and Aston Villa, challenging for the Premier League, wouldn’t fear playing them.

Peter Fox of Stoke City, aged 35, gets profiled, enjoying a return to Stoke City’s team as they try to gain promotion from the Third Tier. Earlier that season, Fox had spent time on loan at Linfield.

There is a 12 page pull-out previewing the League Cup Final between Sheffield Wednesday and Arsenal, with guest pundit Steve Bruce predicting a win for Wednesday. Arsenal won the game 2-1, a match best remembered for Steven Morrow falling over when being given a piggyback by Tony Adams. Morrow wasn’t even mentioned in the preview.

Shoot gives a double page spread on crowd safety, this poll coming just four years after Hillsbrough.

26% of people disagreed with all seater stadiums
21% of people had stopped standing since Hillsbrough
94% of people felt safer supporting their team
51% of people felt safer attending football matches than before Hillsbrough

Ryan Giggs, having just scored his first international goal, against Belgium, gets a full-page poster to commemorate this.

There is a competition to win a complete Panini Serie A stickerbook, and a Lotto football.

In Scottish football news, Raith Rovers manager Jimmy Nicholl is attracting interest from teams looking to replace long serving managers ….. Dundee United and Northern Ireland.

He has yet to manage either.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 21.12.1991

It’s Christmas 1991, and as bizarre covers go, this is up there, as Michaela Strachan is dressed as Cinderella, accompanied by John Fashanu and Vinnie Jones dressed as ugly sisters.

Let’s face it, if there was a role that suited John Fashanu and Vinnie Jones, it was that of panto villains.

The reason for this, was that Strachan was appearing in panto at a theatre in Wimbledon, so Shoot arranged for ‘The Fash’ and ‘Vinnie’ to do a photoshoot with her.

Strachan gets to the ball (a football, of course) after her feet fits into one of Fashanu’s football boots.

Modest as ever, Fashanu declares that he is good enough to play for reigning champions Arsenal, but that he wouldn’t be keen to play under George Graham’s style of management.

All you had to do to find more laughs, as Andy Townsend declares that he is good enough to play in Siere A. 18 months later, Townsend did leave Chelsea, but not for Italy ………….. to Aston Villa.

Townsend did make a valid point asking why so few British players are prepared to move to Mainland Europe, pointing out the struggles of Chris Waddle to get picked for England while playing for France.

The draw for the 1994 World Cup Qualifiers had just taken place, and Shoot covers this.

“England look to have been given a trouble free passage to the 1994 World Cup Finals” says the feature on England’s draw. Oh dear.

There is and end of year review, with a collage of all the front covers in 1991.

Stuart Pearce is subject of a player profile. The best ever Christmas present he received was a signed photo of the Marx Brothers. Something to bear in mind in case you’re buying a Christmas present in the future.

His ideal Christmas Number One was ‘No More Heroes’ by The Stranglers (Brilliant song, not my favourite Stranglers song, but still a brilliant song)

If he had to meet one person, it would be Hugh Cornwell, to ask him why he left the band. After one meeting with Stuart Pearce, I would imagine Hugh Cornwell would be quickly rejoining The Stranglers.

There is an advert for the following week’s edition, which comes with a free wallchart for the 1991-1992 FA and Scottish Cups.

Meanwhile, it was announced that England and Portugal were the only applicants to host Euro 96. It was also announced that the deadline for bids was put back, seemingly to allow Holland and Austria to apply. A footnote to this story was that England were favourites to host Euro 96, which could be the first European Championship to have 16 teams.

As it turned out, England hosted Euro 96, while Holland (co-hosts), Portugal and Austria (co-hosts) all hosted the next three European Championships after that.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 24th DECEMBER 1994

A double issue from Christmas 1994 saw Shoot look back on the year just past.

The cover image is of a Christmas Tree and inset pics of stars of the year such as Alan Shearer, Stan Collymore, Jurgen Klinsmann, Andy Cole, Eric Cantona and Robbie Fowler.

Interesting to note that by summer 1996, three of the cover stars (Cole, Collymore, Shearer) were Britsh record signings.

Founded in 1969, Shoot celebrated it’s 25th birthday in 1994. To commemorate this, they were going to do a Dream Team of all the Premier League clubs. That week’s chosen clubs were Leeds United and Wimbledon.

Shoot does a month by month review of the year, with accompanying posters of that month’s star player.

The photo editor of the results section had an interesting sense of humour as a report on Vinny Jones making his internationl debut for Wales is acoompanied by a picture of him booting Hristo Stoichkov up in the air.

In world news, Roger Milla announced his retirement and Eintracht Frankfurt transfer listed three players – Maurizio Gaudino, Tony Yeboah and Augustine Okocha. All three ended up playing in the Premier League (though Okocha, not for 7 more years)

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 9th NOVEMBER 1991

With the publishing date being the 2nd anniversary of the collapse of the Berlin Wall, it is quite apt the the front cover proclaims another once unstoppable force of the 70s and 80s to be on the verge of collapse, suggesting that Liverpool’s era of domination could be coming to an end.

A double page spread is dedicated to this suggestion, with the writer hinting that Kenny Dalglish saw it coming and wanted to get out with his reputation intact, highlighting high profile defeats to Arsenal (1989 title decider) and Crystal Palace (1990 FA Cup Semi-Final) as evidence of this.

In 1991, such a suggestion would have been laughed at as Liverpool going throught a blip, and that they will be adding to their 18 titles in the 1992/1993 season and beyond.

20 years on, with Liverpool still on 18 titles (and since overtaken by Manchester United), it appears the writer of the article was correct.

There is a poster of Andrei Kanchelskis and of Hibs winning the Skol Cup (That’s Scottish Communities Cup in modern currency)

This week also sees a competition to win videos of classic World Cup matches such as West Germany v France (1982) France v Brazil (1986) and England v West Germany (1990)

Meanwhile, there is a full page advert for Pro Set cards, remember them?

In rumours which look silly now, Leeds want to sign Brian McClair, Vinny Jones wants to play for the Republic Of Ireland, and George Best is to join St Patrick’s Athletic as an advisor.

In actual news, St Johnstone have signed Soviet Union international Sergei Baltacha.

In case you’re wondering, yes, it is Elena Baltacha’s dad.

Warren Barton is featured in a player profile, who disappointingly isn’t asked for his favourite music, so we don’t know if he’s a stereotypical Phil Collins loving footballer.

Warren, 22, is single and lives in a flat in Bethnal Green. He drives a Saab 900I and is keen on Tennis and Golf.

Bet the women are just queing up.

Warrend hates Australian soaps (and Kerry Bishop in particular), is a big fan of Robert De Niro and Julia Roberts, and thinks Lawrie Sanchez is the most boring person at Wimbledon.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : FOUR FOUR TWO – MAY 1997

In this segment, we look at Four Four Two, from May 1997, which pulled off a bit of a scoop by getting Alex Fergsuon (Not yet Sir Alex) and Kenny Dalglish on their front cover as Manchester United and Newcastle United were challenging for the title, alongside Arsenal and Liverpool.

The Premier League was nearing the end of it’s fifth season, and Ferguson and Dalglish (with Blackburn Rovers) had won the previous four, with Fergie leading 3-1

The Spine Line read “Alex, Matt, Tom, Johnny, Matt, Bill, Bill, George” which I guess might be some reference to Scottish managers in English football, considering Ferguson and Dalglish are on the cover with Matt being Busby, Bill being Shankly and George being Graham.

Recently sacked BBC Five Live presenter Danny Baker gets a page dedicated to him in support.

In the world of advertising, Ben Thatcher and Chris Perry of Wimbledon are advertising Valsport’s multicoloured range of boots.

To appreciate the quality of Valsport, you need to wear them apparantly.

World Cups of the future take up space in the magazine, with two pages bizarrely dedicated to wether England should make a joint bid with Germany to host the 2006 World Cup.

England had just successfully hosted Euro 96 and wanted to exploit this by bidding to host the 2006 World Cup, the next tournament (apart from Euro 2004, but having hosted Euro 96, it is unlikely it would be favourably looked at) that was available to bid for.

Germany had long stated their desire to host World Cup 2006. Viewers of ESPN Classic will note that Premier League grounds had hoardings with “England 2006” written on them.

When it came to the vote in the summer of 2000, it was South Africa, not England, who were Germany’s main rival as England were eliminated in the first round of voting.

Germany edged out South Africa, who eventually won the right to host the 2010 World Cup.

A feature titled “The Odd Couple” looks at the 2002 World Cup to be held in South Korea and Japan, the first time ever the World Cup would be co-hosted.

Despite the much feared tensions between the two host nations, the only confrontation of the 2002 World Cup would be between Mick McCarthy and Roy Keane at the Republic of Ireland training camp.