MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : MATCH – 25.12.1982

It’s Christmas 1982 and Match celebrates with a cover image of a sketch of various football stars such as Gordon Strachan, Graeme Souness, Steve Coppell and Paul Mariner.

There’s not much Christmas cheer for the FA, as they come in for criticism for arranging a full top flight fixture list just four days before a European Championship Qualifier.

A series of top flight stars are asked for their Christmas wishes, with Lou Macari wish he could spend Christmas Day with either Russ Abbot or Benny Hill.

Graeme Souness uses his column to state that Scotland haven’t given up on qualifying for Euro 84 despite a poor start which means they have to win the remainder of their games to have a chance of qualifying.

John Gregory of QPR is this “Focus On …” subject, claiming that The Jam, Robert Palmer and Japan is his favourite music.

Moving from Scotland to England, as Graham Rix uses his column to state that he has a battle for his England place after missing out on the recent 9-0 win over Luxembourg.

David Cross has only one wish for Christmas, three points from Manchester City’s visit to Anfield, something that City managed the previous season when they won 3-1 at Anfield.

As well as sketching the front cover, Steve McGarry can be found again near the end of the magazine sketching Murdo MacLeod’s winner for Celtic against Rangers in the recent Scottish League Cup Final.

The magazine can’t end without another rant about the scheduling of England’s match against Luxembourg, this time Tony Morley of Aston Villa who had to miss the game as he was playing for Villa in the World Club Cup Final in Japan the weekend before.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 22.5.1982

Kevin Keegan is the cover star of Shoot as the 1982 World Cup in Spain approaches, and the 24 competing teams are getting ready for their final preparations.

As you open the magazine, Glenn Hoddle tells Shoot that he will only replicate his club form for England if he is given a run of games, while Tony Morley of Aston Villa fears he may miss out in Spain due to manager Ron Greenwood only liking to play one winger.

In news, Keith Burkinshaw and John Toshack have declared that three points for a win, introduced in 1981-1982 season, has been a success, while Gordon Taylor hit back at Trevor Francis and Mick Mills over their criticism of the timing of the PFA Player Of The Year Awards.

Shoot does a full page profile of Arsenal youngster Stewart Robson, who broke into the first-team straight from school.

In adverts, you could get a series of World Cup wallcharts for just £3.50, plus 50p for P and P.

In letters, Liam Farrington from Dublin writes in to protest about English born Tony Galvin being called up to the Republic of Ireland squad.

Gary Shaw uses his column to talk about his joy at Aston Villa reaching the European Cup Final, but also his disappointment that the second leg of their Semi-Final against Anderlecht was ruined by trouble on the terraces.

Ahead of Scotland’s World Cup opener, Shoot asks various Scottish players such as Alfie Conn, Frank McGarvey and Paul Hegarty what the starting 11 in Malaga on June 15th should be.

Shoot does a full page profile on Craig Johnston, who he says has passed his Anfield Apprenticeship, and is now a fully fledged first-team player.

Ray Wilkins uses his column to suggest that England won’t be putting out an experimental side in their friendly against Holland, ahead of the World Cup.

Talking of England, in World Cup Merchandise, you could buy a Memo Pad, complete with a photo of England’s official mascot, Billy Bulldog.

Karl-Heiz Rummenigge is interviewed ahead of the World Cup, and tells Shoot he fears that West Germany’s chances could be ruined by injuries.

It is revealed that Asa Hartford of Manchester City has an unusual hobby, collecting matchbook.

Motherwell were rocked by rumours that manager David Hay was set to resign, while Phil Thompson’s column comments on young players getting an opportunity to play at England’s biggest clubs.

Justin Fashanu uses his column to talk about change in football, as Nottingham Forest go through a transition after a successful period in the late 1970s.

Garry Thompson tells Shoot that he doesn’t want to leave Coventry City, while Everton manager Howard Kendall says that Graeme Sharp is as good as Frank Stapleton.

The magazine ends with a profile of Gary Lineker, who reveals he wants to be a Bookmaker when his playing career ends.