MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 4.4.1981

Liam Brady, sipping from a bottle of water (a glass bottle as well, no health and safety in them days), is the cover star of Shoot, as he adjusts to life in Italy.

As you open the magazine, there is a double page spread on Brady, who has so far been a resounding success at Juventus.

In a bid to improve their style of play, Coventry City have banned their players from passing the ball back to their goalkeeper, while the National Hairdressers Federation have voted Lawrie McMenemy as Head Of The Year, alongside Felicity Kendall.

Derek Johnstone uses his column to comment on how Rangers have missed European football in 1980-1981, and are desperate for it to return to Ibrox in 1981-1982, as he reflects on his favourite memories taking on continental opposition.

Another Scotsman with a column is Andy Gray, who states that he is baffled by Wolves recent poor form.

The recent PFA Awards get covered, as John Wark wins Player Of The Year, and Gary Shaw wings Young Player Of The Year.

Ray Clemence’s column analyses the recent League Cup Final between Liverpool and West Ham, which finished 1-1, with a replay due to be played at Villa Park this week. That match gets profiled a few pages over.

Shoot profiles two former England players trying to have success as a manager, Larry Lloyd of Wigan and Norman Hunter of Barnsley, while new Bristol City goalkeeper Jan Moller says he wants to be as good as Peter Shilton, the goalkeeper at the opposition end of the pitch in the 1979 European Cup Final.

Another foreigner in England getting profiled is Bosco Jankovic of Middlesbrough, whose contract is expiring, and he has decide wether to stay in England or return to Yugoslavia.

Diego Maradona gets a profile after becoming the world’s first Ā£4m player when he moved from Argentinos to Boca Juniors.

Gordon McQueen uses his column to write about three young strikers at Manchester United he believes will be big stars in the future – Norman Whiteside, Mark Hughes and Scott McGarvey. Two out of three ain’t bad.

Four footballing figures get interviewed on how to improve the game. West Bromwich Albion manager Ron Atkinson is not in favour of Sunday football, but is in favour of three points for a win.

The magazine ends with a profile of Steve Moran of Southampton, who reveals that his favourite music is Mike Oldfield and Diana Ross.

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 14.7.1979

Match action from England’s recent visit to Sweden is the cover of Shoot, as they try to fill in the gap during the pre-season of 1979.

In news, Brian Clough has drawn praise from pundits in the Soviet Union after Nottingham Forest’s European Cup win, and Northern Ireland have announced a tour of Australia for the summer of 1980.

Pierce O’Leary of Shamrock Rovers was linked with a move to Coventry City, potentially, the first League Of Ireland player to move to an English club for a six figure fee. Staying in Dublin, Pele was a surprise visitor to Dublin for the friendly between Republic of Ireland and Argentina.

Distillery were facing expulsion from the Irish League if they couldn’t have a new ground by the start of the 1980-1981 season.

And finally, Coventry City became the first Football League team to visit the Faroe Islands, beating a local team 6-0.

The volume of British players in the US meant the NASL got a page of coverage, the lead story being that George Best had went missing for a week.

Gordon McQueen, writing a column, expresses his concern that the games between England and Scotland could be banned due to crowd violence, expressing his anger at a Scottish fan who invaded the pitch with his side 1-0 up, causing a delay. England went on to win the game 3-1.

McQueen also spoke about an 18 year old called Diego Maradona, who faced Scotland and was described by McQueen as “Another Pele in the making”, but was disappointed at the lack of TV coverage of the game, due to a dispute with the BBC.

In letters, a Shrewsbury Town fan complains about the lack of acknowledgement given to boss Graham Turner for his success at the club. A reader from Perth wrote in to complain about the BBC being biased towards Rangers.

A young manager starting out in the game is 32 year old Howard Kendall, and his appointment at Blackburn Rovers gets 2/3 of a page coverage.

RC Strasbourg get a full page profile, with a team poster on the other side.

To fill up space with no football, we get a full page of footballers on holiday, including a picture of Phil Neal throwing Phil Thompson into a swimming pool.

Part 8 of Shoot’s review of the 1978-1979 season reveals that Barcelona want Bobby Robson to be their manager. It only took 17 years for them to get him.

Derek Johnstone’s Scottish football column is accompanied by a picture of him playing video games with his wife.

Wigan Athletic, having just completed their first season as a league club, feature in an article asking if they will “Do a Wimbledon” – Wimbledon (promoted to the Football League in 1977) got promoted in their second season.

Wigan did indeed “Do a Wimbledon” in terms that they reached the top flight (in 27 years compared to Wimbledon’s 9) and won the FA Cup (took them 35 years compared to Wimbledon’s 11)

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 9.5.1987

Glenn Hoddle is the cover star as Shoot counts down to the 1987 FA Cup Final between Coventry City and Tottenham Hotspur.

Glenn Hoddle gives Shoot an exclusive and revealing interview. He states that he wished Bobby Robson was appointed England manager earlier, and that if he was, he would be on course (he was 29 at the time of the interview) for 100 caps.

His England career ended in 1988 with 53 caps.

Hoddle also stated that he wished to move to Mainland Europe. He said he had turned down a move to Cologne in 1979 as he was too young, and an Achilles injury in 1984 saw Napoli withdraw their interest in making a bid for him.

He cited the examples of England team-mates Gary Lineker and Mark Hateley. At this time, there was a talent drain of English and British (Mark Hughes was already at Barcelona, and Ian Rush was soon to join Juventus) players due to a combination of being able to earn more money abroad, and most importantly, English clubs being banned from Europe as a result of Heysel.

That summer, Hoddle signed for AS Monaco, by a manager who would go on to make North London his home …… Arsene Wenger.

Interestingly, Hoddle also has his doubts as to wether Clive Allen (who scored 49 goals in 86/87) was up to the standard of international football. Allen only won 5 England caps and never scored a goal.

As part of the preview of the following week’s FA Cup Final, Tottenham’s Semi-Final win over Watford got a double page picture spread.

Gary Strodder, a rising star at West Ham, gets a full page feature.

Peter Reid gets a full page column, and writes a tribute to Everton’s squad players, who have contributed to them being on the verge of winning the title, which he believes they will. They did.

Jason Bate from from Stafford writes in to Jimmy Greaves to complain about the standard of facilities at English league grounds.

Greaves replies by saying the letter could have been written 25 years ago, and that things won’t change in another 25 years.

25 years on, I think it’s fair to say that facilities in English football have improved.

Dundee United, the first Scottish club to reach the UEFA Cup Final get a full page feature ahead of the first leg (Yes, younger readers, the UEFA Cup Final used to be 2 legs) and an interview with Iain Ferguson, who would miss the first leg through suspension.

The article comments that if Dundee United triumph, Scotland will have won all three European trophies. United lost 2-1 on aggregate, the first of three clubs (Celtic in 2003 and Rangers in 2008) to have lost the UEFA Cup Final.

Oxford United’s star striker Dean Saunders gets a full page profile, focusing on a range of coincidental similarities with former Oxford striker John Aldridge. Like Aldridge, Saunders would go on to play for Liverpool.

Shoot does a feature on the job security of managers in England’s top two divisions, and gives a rating for each manager.

Alex Ferguson, recently appointed at Manchester United, was given a rating of ‘Room For Improvement’

13 League titles, 5 FA Cups, 4 League Cups, 2 European Cups and 1 Cup Winners Cup later, i’d say things have improved.

In their section on world football, Soviet Union goalkeeper Rinat Dasiev confidently predicts that his side will win Euro 88, and that England will be their biggest rivals.

Soviet Union reached the final, losing 2-0 to Holland, having been in the same group as England. That match finished 3-1 to Soviet Union, as England finished bottom of their group, losing all 3 matches.

In the name of equality, Coventry’s FA Cup Semi-Final win over Leeds gets a double page spread.

This week’s player profile was of Kevin Gallacher, looking forward to the UEFA Cup Final with Dundee United.

His favourite TV shows are “Grange Hill and all sports programmes” and his favourite band are Simple Minds

MAGAZINE ARCHIVE : SHOOT – 10.4.1993

Chris Waddle and Mark Bright are the cover stars as Shoot reviews the 1993 FA Cup Semi-Finals, both Derby games (Sheffield and North London) with the Sheffield game getting the most coverage on the cover.

Pages 4-5 are a double page spread on the Sheffield Derby at Wembley, won 2-1 by Wednesday after extra-time.

Page 6 is a curious competition where you could win a Sega Game Gear, and a shaving kit.

In news, Sergei Baltacha, top scorer with Oakbank under 13s in Perth, is having a trial with Ipswich Town, who is dad played for a few years previously.

He eventually converted to a left-back and played for St Mirren and Milwall. If the name sounds familiar, his sister is the Tennis player Elena Baltacha.

Meanwhile, Southend’s Stan Collymore had an unusual pre-match routine, trying to spot managers in the crowd, saying he’d spotted Trevor Francis (Sheffield Wednesday) and George Graham (Arsenal)

One man who had hoped to see was Ron Atkinson

“That would be the dream move, to Aston Villa, They were the first team I went to see”

Stan Collymore did sign for Aston Villa four years late, but under Brian Little.

Arsenal’s 1-0 win over Spurs got a double page spread, with a photo collage of Tony Adams, whos scored the winning goal, greatest moments.

Jimmy Greaves Letters Page sees Neil Sinclair from London write in about Australia and Ghana’s performances at the recent World Youth Championship, asking if the power in world football is changing.

Greavsie wasn’t sure about Australia, but that African football was on the march and there could be an African World Cup winner in 20 years time.

20 years on, we are still waiting for an African country to win the World Cup.

He adds that “By 2000, Africa will take over from South America as the leading exponent of free-style football”

Australia and Ghana took until 2006 to qualify for the World Cup.

Meanwhile, Philip Heaver from Norfolk complains about Mark Robins and Ruel Fox not being selected for England.

Still in this season’s competition, Marseille were already planning their attempts to win the 1994 European Cup with summer moves for David Platt and Julio Cesar.

Marseille were banned from the 93-94 European Cup due to a match fixing scandal. David Platt signed for Sampdoria that summer.

Sampdoria, coincidentally, had a centrepage poster in that edition.

With the title race in the final stages, Shoot attempts predicting the Easter Saturday games.

They predicted a 2-1 win for Manchester United over Sheffield Wednesday, though i’m not sure they predicted it to be as dramatic as it turned out.

Aston Villa, top of the league, were predicted by Shoot to beat Coventry City 3-1. It finished 0-0, and they were overtaken by Manchester United, who weren’t dislodged for the rest of the season.

The recent PFA Awards got a page, focusing on Paul McGrath and Ryan Giggs success.